Duurzaam Beleggen

Sustainable investing

at ABN AMRO Private Banking

The future of investing

Our society is changing. And that includes investing. More and more investors are focusing part of their portfolios on sustainability. This is a good thing because sustainable investments are crucial for the future of our world and our wallets.

It is not just about returns but the consequences of an investment for society that play an important role in sustainable investment. You invest in companies that are at the forefront of finding and maintaining the balance between people, the environment and society.

Duurzaamheidsrapportage

Your sustainability report

What is the sustainable impact of your investments?

If you invest with ABN AMRO, your quarterly report will show you an overview of the sustainable impact of your investments. You will be able to see how sustainable your investments are, whether your investments are achieving suitable benchmarks and what your contribution is to the various treaties that are aiming to make the world more sustainable. More information is available on the following web pages.

Our sustainable investment solutions

Duurzaam beleggen mandaat

Sustainable Discretionary Portfolio Management

For you, investing is more than just capital growth. You want to invest in sustainable organisations, in companies that pursue not only financial but also social returns. In companies that lead the way in finding and maintaining the balance between 'people, planet & profit'. The portfolio managers make clear choices to put together a socially responsible investment portfolio.

Duurzaam Beleggingsadvies

Sustainable Investment Advice

Sustainable Investment Advice is aimed at investors who consider sustainability important and want to invest in companies that take the balance between people, planet and profit into account. You will receive tailor-made investment suggestions, aimed at a sustainable and stable composition of your investment portfolio. You invest together with your personal investment advisor, but you decide on purchases and sales yourself.

Want to go one step further?

Impact Beleggen

Unique in Belgium: the Impact Mandate

Many of our clients already invest sustainably in order to increase their social contribution. At the same time, our clients increasingly want to know how much impact they can make with sustainable investments. With our new Impact Mandate, we now have the answer to that question. The Impact Mandate builds on ABN AMRO's sustainability strategy. In addition to screening for ESG factors, the bank has developed a second methodology together with ISS-Oekom. Only companies whose turnover makes a net positive contribution to a better world stand a chance of being included in the portfolio, which includes bonds and alternatives alongside shares.
Steeds meer cliënten beleggen duurzaam

More and more customers are investing in sustainability

Currently, more than EUR 26 billion has been invested in sustainability with ABN AMRO. We aim to grow this with 26% by the end of 2021, and 35% in 2024.* When you opt for sustainable investing, you contribute to a sustainable future for yourself and for generations to come.

Source: Annual Report 2020

How to get started in sustainable investment at ABN AMRO Private Banking

1. Schedule an appointment

Schedule an appointment with one of our specialists. You can easily make  an appointment online .

2. Define sustainable goals

During a no-obligation meeting we will discuss your goals and desires in the field of sustainable asset management.

3. Choose investment type

Based on the outcome of the meeting, you will choose the type of investment that suits you.

Our choices and opinions

Sustainability isn't just about caring for the environment. Caring for people and society in the right way is also a sustainable choice. How do we make our sustainable choices and how do we tackle the dilemmas that those choices present? Find out below.
What is the dilemma presented by child labour?

In practice, opting out of child labour has proven to be virtually impossible. A lot of child labour takes place in the supply chain, which is difficult to oversee. The textile chain is a good example of this. Supply chain companies are almost never directly involved in child labour, but they may be indirectly involved. It is more meaningful to assess how companies deal with child labour when it does turn out to be taking place in their chain. Do they communicate with the supplier? Are they open about where they have their products made? Do they perform checks? Are those checks having any results? Our assessment of the company's sustainability takes all this into account.
What is the dilemma presented by the emerging markets?

We want to invest in emerging markets to contribute to the UN’s sustainable development goals. These countries often need funding to further their economic progress, reduce poverty and invest in basic needs. At the same time, people often associate companies in these countries with corruption, pollution and poor working conditions. 

We also look at ESG ratings and any controversies surrounding listed companies in emerging markets, and we select only the best companies. We have also selected several funds that invest in unlisted companies in emerging markets, which consequently do not have an ESG rating. However, the fund managers make sure the companies in these funds have a strong ESG policy.

What is the dilemma presented by nuclear weapons?

We consider all weapons manufacturers as unsustainable and we exclude them from any sustainable investments. Of course this also includes more controversial weapons such as nuclear weapons. So does this mean that we have to exclude government bonds from countries that have nuclear weapons, such as France? France has signed the Non-Proliferation Treaty and is a member of NATO. France will therefore only use nuclear weapons reactively in extreme cases. France is also making significant efforts to meet the climate goals and is therefore helping to combat climate change. That is why we are not excluding government bonds from France or other countries that have signed the Non-Proliferation Treaty.
What is the dilemma presented by genetically modified organisms (GMOs)?

National and international rules on the use of GMOs have been agreed. Not all food manufacturers are transparent about whether any GMOs have been mixed into their products. GMOs are relatively new, so questions remain about the long-term effects. Many people are therefore against genetically modified foods. However, the world's demand for food is rising fast as the global population rockets, so we may need GMOs to meet this demand.
What is the dilemma presented by animal testing?

Animal testing is important and sometimes is even legally required to manufacture safe, good-quality medicines and food. Although these tests encounter resistance in society at large, they remain necessary for the time being. It goes without saying that this requires careful consideration as we make our investment choices.
What is the dilemma presented by nuclear power?

Modern nuclear power is a relatively 'clean' way to generate energy. The CO2 emissions are minimal and modern nuclear power plants are far safer than the older generations. They also produce less nuclear waste. Nuclear power will remain an important part of the energy mix if we wish to achieve the goals of the Paris Agreement. Even though modern plants produce minimal amounts of nuclear waste, this is still a problem when it comes to public opinion. 

We will generally not invest in companies that are involved exclusively in nuclear power generation. However, we may invest in energy companies with nuclear power operations in addition to other forms of energy. Or rather, we invest in green bonds issued by these companies. These are bonds whose proceeds are used specifically to fund sustainable energy projects, such as wind turbines and solar panels. We also want to encourage companies that are involved in nuclear energy to invest in renewable energy via these bonds.

What is the dilemma presented by child labour?

In practice, opting out of child labour has proven to be virtually impossible. A lot of child labour takes place in the supply chain, which is difficult to oversee. The textile chain is a good example of this. Supply chain companies are almost never directly involved in child labour, but they may be indirectly involved. It is more meaningful to assess how companies deal with child labour when it does turn out to be taking place in their chain. Do they communicate with the supplier? Are they open about where they have their products made? Do they perform checks? Are those checks having any results? Our assessment of the company's sustainability takes all this into account.

What is the dilemma presented by the emerging markets?

We want to invest in emerging markets to contribute to the UN’s sustainable development goals. These countries often need funding to further their economic progress, reduce poverty and invest in basic needs. At the same time, people often associate companies in these countries with corruption, pollution and poor working conditions. 

We also look at ESG ratings and any controversies surrounding listed companies in emerging markets, and we select only the best companies. We have also selected several funds that invest in unlisted companies in emerging markets, which consequently do not have an ESG rating. However, the fund managers make sure the companies in these funds have a strong ESG policy.

What is the dilemma presented by nuclear weapons?

We consider all weapons manufacturers as unsustainable and we exclude them from any sustainable investments. Of course this also includes more controversial weapons such as nuclear weapons. So does this mean that we have to exclude government bonds from countries that have nuclear weapons, such as France? France has signed the Non-Proliferation Treaty and is a member of NATO. France will therefore only use nuclear weapons reactively in extreme cases. France is also making significant efforts to meet the climate goals and is therefore helping to combat climate change. That is why we are not excluding government bonds from France or other countries that have signed the Non-Proliferation Treaty.

What is the dilemma presented by genetically modified organisms (GMOs)?

National and international rules on the use of GMOs have been agreed. Not all food manufacturers are transparent about whether any GMOs have been mixed into their products. GMOs are relatively new, so questions remain about the long-term effects. Many people are therefore against genetically modified foods. However, the world's demand for food is rising fast as the global population rockets, so we may need GMOs to meet this demand.

What is the dilemma presented by animal testing?

Animal testing is important and sometimes is even legally required to manufacture safe, good-quality medicines and food. Although these tests encounter resistance in society at large, they remain necessary for the time being. It goes without saying that this requires careful consideration as we make our investment choices.

What is the dilemma presented by nuclear power?

Modern nuclear power is a relatively 'clean' way to generate energy. The CO2 emissions are minimal and modern nuclear power plants are far safer than the older generations. They also produce less nuclear waste. Nuclear power will remain an important part of the energy mix if we wish to achieve the goals of the Paris Agreement. Even though modern plants produce minimal amounts of nuclear waste, this is still a problem when it comes to public opinion. 

We will generally not invest in companies that are involved exclusively in nuclear power generation. However, we may invest in energy companies with nuclear power operations in addition to other forms of energy. Or rather, we invest in green bonds issued by these companies. These are bonds whose proceeds are used specifically to fund sustainable energy projects, such as wind turbines and solar panels. We also want to encourage companies that are involved in nuclear energy to invest in renewable energy via these bonds.

Julien Richelle

Investing at ABN AMRO Private Banking

Are you interested in investing with ABN AMRO Private Banking? Please contact Julien Richelle to discuss your wishes and needs and get to know our personal services.